The Disaster Artist (R)

Based on Greg Sestero’s book of the same title which tells the true story of the making of the movie, The Room (2003) and his relationship with The Room’s writer, director, producer, and star, Tommy Wiseau, The Disaster Artist is directed by and stars James Franco and costars his brother Dave (who plays Greg Sestero). Wiseau is a flailing aspiring actor who moves to Hollywood with his best (and only) friend and fellow aspiring actor (Greg) in pursuit of fame, despite the fact that Wiseau is truly, truly untalented. Wiseau is a man with delusions of grandeur. What he lacked in talent and common sense, he more than made up for in disposable funds. He spent an estimated $6 million to finance his “masterwork”; known in the industry as the best bad movie ever made (26% on the tomatometer; 3.6 out of 10 stars on imdb. Not that I put any stock into ratings such as these, but just to give you an idea of what we are dealing with here). The Room grossed less than $2,000 its opening weekend, but has since become somewhat of a cult classic with the legend of the movie outshining the movie itself.

Along with his talent-free status, Wiseau is portrayed as a socially and emotionally (and perhaps developmentally) challenged, self-indulgent, ego driven individual who surrounds himself with “yes men” and appears to have no true friends. His only “true” friend is Greg (Dave Franco) but, due to whatever Wiseau’s shortcomings may be (it is mentioned he was involved in a very serious car accident) he lacks the social capabilities to maintain a “normal” friendship.

James Franco does some of the best acting I’ve ever seen him do here. Don’t get me wrong. He’s no “Brando” all of a sudden – nor does he have to be. And I’m no great fan so I’ve not seen every piece of work he’s ever done. The last thing I reviewed with him in it is Why Him, which was painfully unfunny (see my review in the link if you care to). He found a role that fits him perfectly as he plays this truly talentless, oddball with this terribly thick European-sounding accent (I say European-sounding because there was so much that was unknown about Tommy it could have all very well been a put-on.  Who knows?). Tommy is exhaustively full of energy and one of those people who feels the need to be “on” all the time. He is easily offended and wounded. He is difficult to relate to and understand (not only because of his thick accent, but the meaning of his actual words are difficult to decipher; his affect is flat and his reactions are not congruent to those around him). He is truly a caricature of himself. I grew tired just watching him and couldn’t imagine having to deal with such a person on a regular basis (unless he were my own child, and honestly, even then it would be challenging, to be completely honest with you all); much less working for or with such a person. Franco does a great job carrying this film with Wiseau’s wackiness; as it is Wiseau’s wackiness that on the one hand endears the character to the audience, and on the other hand, makes it difficult for the audience to garner sympathy for him, at times.

The story is well written. It is truly beyond comical at times, and I laughed through much of this movie because this character and the circumstances surrounding him are all just so ridiculous it’s hard to accept that all of this, or some version of this, really happened. The movie, The Room, is the proof that it actually happened! When the gravity sinks in that this man has a real problem relating to others, is somewhat of a power hungry control freak, a bit of an a-hole, and is immature in that he has unrealistic expectations of others and the world, it’s not so funny anymore. It gets kind of sad – but sad in a good way. Sad in a way that makes the story more interesting and shows many sides of this flawed, rich, arrogant, kind of crazy, sometimes lovable, mysterious, kind of slow but only manipulatively so, demanding, sometimes generous person. This character is fleshed out well and the viewer gets the full magnitude of what working with Wiseau must have been like for everyone involved in this terrible film of his.

The Disaster Artist earned  8 out of 10 bloops. It is not a movie without flaws, but it is a solidly funny and interesting movie based on one man’s original, true story, that is absolutely worth seeing. If you’re a Franco fan, it should not be missed. Franco’s performance earns 8.5 out of 10 bloops. He really did well. I’ve never seen The Room but I have to admit that now I want to, if only to see how laughably terrible it is. If you are interested in seeing The Room on the big screen there will be an 11:55 p.m. show at the Landmark Sunshine Cinema on Houston Street in NYC this upcoming Friday.

Thank you for reading. You can scroll down, enter your email address to subscribe to bloopbymimi, and never miss a review!

Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

What I’m reviewing next…

Lady Bird

I still have to see Coco, Wonder, Wonder Wheel, 1945, I Tonya, and The Florida Project. Whew! I am behind.

What I’m absolutely seeing this week

Ferdinand
Downsizing
Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle – I’m going to see this one for you all, not for myself.  I’m not expecting much but will go in with an open mind.
The Greatest Showman – I have passes to see a preview on 12/18!

Other Reviews

Call Me By Your Name
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri
The Shape of Water
Marshall
The Man Who Invented Christmas
Victoria and Abdul
Thor: Ragnarok
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Mother!
It
Good Time
Atomic Blonde
Dunkirk
Girls Trip
Spider-Man: Homecoming
The Big Sick
Baby Driver
All Eyez on Me 
It Comes at Night 
The Wedding Plan 
Wonder Woman
Everything, everything
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
Raw
Kong: Skull Island
Logan
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness 
Get Out
Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
I Am Not Your Negro
The Lobster

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Call Me By Your Name (R)

Based on a book by Andre Aciman, and starring Timothée (pronounced Timo-TAY) Chalamet (as Elio) and Armie Hammer (as Eliot), Call Me By Your Name is not your typical coming of age story. What sets it apart (among so many other things) is that it is about a teenage boy’s first time with a woman, his first time with a man, and a couple of other “firsts.”

This movie is important for quite a few reasons. It is one of only a few mainstream, teen coming of age love stories involving homosexuals. And yes, it is a love story (I had no idea what it was about going in) – about a summer fling. The lovers just happen to both be male. Even more importantly, Call Me By Your Name shows these super supportive parents who trust their child, have faith in the way they have raised him and allow him to be his own person without judgment, while he figures himself out. Without. Judgment. This very much mirrors my own parenting style. Educate/inform and discuss, set free. I believe in preparing a child for real life and the inevitable flight they must take on their own journey. I believe in letting them live their lives; not your version of their lives. Love them for who they are; whoever that may be. (As long as they are not a serial killer or something crazy. Then we have a serious problem.)

Call Me By Your Name is an important story because it focuses on love and camaraderie between and among men. Complex and strong emotional bonds do not exist exclusively among women, but you wouldn’t really know that looking at what Hollywood has delivered so far. And it isn’t just about romantic love. It is also about how men build friendship, collegial relationships and the father/son relationship. Part of this kid’s coming of age is about the all important moment when we (at least we all should at some point in a healthy parent: child relationship) reestablish our relationship with our parents from parent: child to adult: adult.

The writing is strong as we watch the evolution of Elio from a gangly, unsure boy to a young adult within a very short time period. I do not mind the fact that the young boy is 17 (not 18) and involved with an older man. I know in many places that would be considered statutory rape, at the very least. But the story doesn’t take place in America, the boy’s family is very eclectic and forward thinking, the boy was mature for his age in many ways (and of course not so much in other ways) and no one was forced to do anything they didn’t want to do. And seriously, the 6 foot 5 hotness that is Armie Hammer in this movie is serious ya’ll. He’s beautiful in this movie – smart, interesting, charismatic, thoughtful, good looking. Nearly everyone in the movie developed some sort of a crush on him.

Call Me By Your Name is well directed by Luca Guadagnino. I didn’t feel like an outsider looking in. I felt as if I were inside of this young man’s experience, in Northern Italy in 1983 with the locations, set design, the music and the clothing. The scenery is gorgeous. It makes me want to book a trip to Italy right now, honestly.  Suspense is built by these two guys flirting, obsessing over one another, avoiding one another, resisting, sneaking around, and the way it is directed (along with the way it is written and acted of course) allows you to feel all of this. The same way one would feel it all if the stars were a man and a woman. I forgot all about the homosexuality of it all after a while, as it really became about this flirtation/love affair.

The acting is wonderful. Chalamet is extremely talented while being adorable and fearless at the same time. He relayed what a first love looks like from start (the all consuming crush) to finish (the bitter sweet conclusion) quite convincingly. Michael Stuhlbarg as Elio’s father brought me to tears with some outstanding dialogue about life he delivers to his son after questioning him to verify the suspected nature of his relationship with Eliot. It is stirring, beautiful, heartfelt and so honest. It made me miss my own dad who at times was this type of straight shooting truth telling father to me.

Call Me By Your Name earned 8.5 out of 10 bloops. It is a great movie that reminded me of what I love about movies. It made me feel a great deal in a world where as an adult being numb much of the time is a requirement in order to survive with your mental health in-tact. This movie, if you choose give it a chance, will make you feel what lust and love feels like and relive those emotions of first love – regardless of your sexual orientation. Love is love is love is love is love is love is love is love people. It is a great feat to take an emotion out of someone’s head, put it onto paper and have it successfully executed on screen.

As always, this is not a film for everyone. If the sight of two men engaging in sexual activity makes you squirm, just keep it moving. If you’re embarrassed by love and sex scenes (heterosexual or homosexual), skip it. You might not want to take your grandmother or your teenager without knowing what you’re getting in to, or now that you have a better idea of what goes on, maybe you do. I don’t know your family. You can decide. I didn’t find it incredibly graphic, but four people (two who were together and two individuals) walked out during the screening I attended.

Thank you for reading. You can scroll down, enter your email address to subscribe to bloopbymimi, and never miss a review!

Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

What I’m reviewing next…

The Disaster Artist

What I’m seeing next…

I, Tonya
Wonder; and
Roman J. Israel, Esq.

Other Reviews

The Disaster Artist
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri
The Shape of Water
Marshall
The Man Who Invented Christmas
Victoria and Abdul
Thor: Ragnarok
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Mother!
It
Good Time
Atomic Blonde
Dunkirk
Girls Trip
Spider-Man: Homecoming
The Big Sick
Baby Driver
All Eyez on Me 
It Comes at Night 
The Wedding Plan 
Wonder Woman
Everything, everything
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
Raw
Kong: Skull Island
Logan
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness 
Get Out
Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
I Am Not Your Negro
The Lobster

Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri

Written and directed by Martin McDonagh and starring Frances McDormand and Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is billed as a comedy, crime, drama. It’s been seven months since Mildred’s (McDormand’s) daughter has been brutally tortured, raped and murdered, and Mildred wants answers. She sets out on a mission to prompt local authorities to find the answers she so desperately needs by renting three billboards on the outskirts of town on which she posts a message to the local police in order to keep the case a top priority. The result is an escalating war between Mildred and the Ebbing police department, and the town takes sides.

The comedy includes some bad words, including “the N word”. I do not mention it because the use of the word offends me. I mention this specifically because as one of the few black people in the theater, what I noticed about the people seated immediately around me was, if I didn’t laugh out loud no one did. And I laughed because the jokes were just too funny not to laugh – but that was a weird experience for me. (It was as if the non black people were taking social cues from me; waiting for me to grant them permission to laugh out loud when the N word was used.) Anyway, the word wasn’t carelessly thrown about, it wasn’t used often and, the word was properly corrected in a humorous way whenever it was used.  Even some of the more tragic moments were comedic. Suffice to say, the humor here is a bit “blue,” so if that isn’t your thing, this is not the movie for you.

The crime is heartbreaking. Frances McDormand really allows you to get inside the head and heart of a mother who is obsessed with and grieving over the unsolved murder of her child. She becomes a bad-ass superhero who will not let up until someone tells here who killed her child. She is a mother who will go to any lengths to light a fire under these local, small town police officers.

The drama is consistently high throughout the film and even increases toward the end. I didn’t know which way this story was going to go at any given point and I certainly had no idea how it all would end. There are quite a few shocking scenes. There is nothing predictable or boilerplate about this movie.

The writing is strong as it intertwines the humor, crime and drama constantly, never getting too heavy in any one area.  Not only are the humor, crime and drama artfully interwoven throughout the story, most of the characters fluctuate between humor, crime (talking about this crime, their obsession with the crime or in a few instances, committing a new crime) and drama. It was an enjoyable hour and 55 minutes and I very nearly applauded at the end. (Guess I was taking social cues from those around me at that point.)

McDormand and the rest of the cast deliver amazing performances, but McDormand stands out because of how powerfully written her character is and how exceptionally she performs.  The rest of the cast does an outstanding job as nearly every role requires waxing and waning between drama and comedy, and they nail it.

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri earned 8.5 out of 10 bloops. McDormand’s excellent, must-see performance pushes it up to a 9. It is a fantastic film that’s not for everyone, but I enjoyed it a great deal. It is one of those thoughtfully done projects where the great care taken to execute it shows in all aspects of the film; the writing, acting, directing, cinematography, scenery, props, wardrobe, makeup – everything about Three Billboards pays off.

Thank you for reading. You can scroll down, enter your email address to subscribe to bloopbymimi, and never miss a review!

 Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

Welcome message

What I’m reviewing next…

Call Me By Your Name

What I’m seeing next…

I, Tonya
Wonder; and
Roman J. Israel, Esq.; and 


Previous Reviews

The Shape of Water
Marshall
The Man Who Invented Christmas
Victoria and Abdul
Thor: Ragnarok
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Mother!
It
Good Time
Atomic Blonde
Dunkirk
Girls Trip
Spider-Man: Homecoming
The Big Sick
Baby Driver
All Eyez on Me 
It Comes at Night 
The Wedding Plan 
Wonder Woman
Everything, everything
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
Raw
Kong: Skull Island
Logan
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness 
Get Out
Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
I Am Not Your Negro
The Lobster

The Shape of Water (R)

Starring Sally Hawkins, Doug Jones, Richard Jenkins, Michael Shannon and Octavia Spencer, The Shape of Water is Guillermo del Toro‘s latest passion project. del Toro wrote the story, co-wrote the screenplay, directed and co-produced. So, he had real artistic control over his vision. Whether it fails or floats all rests on his shoulders.

Let me just start off by saying, WOOOOWWWA! This is one of those movies that is not for everybody.  Everybody is soooooo not going to like it and everyone will not “get it.” There will be trash talk but. Don’t. You. Believe. It!  The Shape of Water is surreal and beautiful and meaningful and artistic and the story is just so strange it stands out in all the best ways. This is one of those films that I’m not giving away one detail about, or at least I will try really, really hard not to. I didn’t know anything about it going in and I believe that is the best way to watch this movie, or any other for that matter. I sat down with a clear mind ready to take in whatever was about to happen and was immediately drawn in by the music and the visuals and it just got better and better as we moved along. You absolutely have to suspend everything you think you know to understand this is not just some goofy, silly, foolish movie. And I can see how those who won’t like it will talk about it. You have to surrender yourself, fall into it and enjoy the ride. If your ass is too tight to do that, steer clear.  This is just not the movie for you.  You know you, I don’t, and I don’t say that as some sort of insult. I say that as a self-aware adult.

I feel as though any time anyone takes their artistic vision out of their head and pours it out onto their preferred canvas for the world to see; that brave act should be applauded. But to make a piece of art that is so thoughtful and beautiful and made with such great care and grace; and then that piece of art makes the audience think about not only what they are looking at, but about themselves, society, humanity and the world in general; that is mastery! Similar to real life, The Shape of Water is sad with these joyful moments here and there that uplift you before you get dropped back down, then lifted again using these imperfect people who endear you to them in one way or another. This is a place where a “monster” becomes human and a human becomes a monster. It is a very emotional ride full of highs and lows and lulls and themes and everything. It’s about love, intolerance, hate, acceptance, loneliness, the human condition, how love can heal, how evil rots and power corrupts, and much, much, much, much more. It is moving and touching and sweet and ugly, and has just the proper amount of goriness.

The acting is stupendous.  I mean every single actor came ready to play.  Michael Shannon will make you want to smack him in the absolute best way. Sally Hawkins blew me away. She was so expressive and channeled this otherwise meek woman who goes through this metamorphosis that is so great, yet so subtle at the same time; and you will cheer for her deep down inside of your soul if you have one. I don’t think there’s any doubt she has a best actress nomination coming her way and she is the one to beat at this point. The supporting cast did an outstanding job all the way around (Octavia Spencer or Richard Jenkins or Michael Shannon could see supporting actor nominations.  Just, so good). It was just a well executed effort.

The Shape of Water earned 9.5 out of 10 bloops.  It really is creativity in movie making at its finest, and the story earns a 10 from me (although I’m sure there is someone much better versed in film than I who can draw a comparison to other movie plots). It is not a perfect film. It even loses focus from time to time (thus the .5 shaved off of the perfect 10, but I reserve the right to change my mind and give up the 10 after I see it again. And I will see it again! Like, as soon as possible!). It is an amazingly, crazy, heart-felt, beautiful story. The acting is sublime. It is visually spectacular. It is brilliantly directed. I expect many, many nominations to come out of this one.  You can just feel the commitment to the project in every aspect. The acting, the scenery, the music, the sound, the effects, the set design – all amazing, the cinematography, the direction, the makeup. Every note was so nearly perfectly executed (and I’m still torn between giving it all 10 bloops).  Go see it on the big screen to take in all that visual love.

Thank you for reading. You can scroll down, enter your email address to subscribe to bloopbymimi, and never miss a review!

 Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

Welcome message

What I’m seeing next…

Wonder; and
Roman J. Israel, Esq.; and 

The Disaster Artist

Other Reviews

The Disaster Artist
Call Me By Your Name
Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri
Marshall
The Man Who Invented Christmas
Victoria and Abdul
Thor: Ragnarok
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Mother!
It
Good Time
Atomic Blonde
Dunkirk
Girls Trip
Spider-Man: Homecoming
The Big Sick
Baby Driver
All Eyez on Me 
It Comes at Night 
The Wedding Plan 
Wonder Woman
Everything, everything
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
Raw
Kong: Skull Island
Logan
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness 
Get Out
Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
I Am Not Your Negro
The Lobster

Marshall (PG-13)

Starring Chadwick Boseman and Josh Gad, Marshall is based on the true story of one of the lower profile cases argued by Thurgood Marshall which primed him for his eventual career as a Supreme Court Justice.  Long before successfully arguing Brown vs. the Board of Education (1954) before the Supreme Court, Marshall argued The State of Connecticut v. Joseph Spell (1941).  Marshall worked for the NAACP, which at the time had so many civil rights cases to contend with they had to be very selective about which cases the organization pursued.  “Winability” of a case was a key factor in taking a case because when the NAACP took on a case it built buzz around that case and the historical and legal importance of the outcome.  One court case at a time, the law and times were changing and black people were litigating and being represented in ways they hadn’t before.

In the case of Spell, the suspect had already confessed to the crime and the court of public opinion had already tried and convicted the man in the press before Thurgood even showed up.  So, how does one win a case in segregated 1941 Connecticut, within a judicial system so racist Marshall cannot argue the case himself and has to use a reluctant white/Jewish figurehead to do his talking?  That’s right.  According to this movie, Marshall was forbidden from speaking at all in court by the judge, lest he would be dismissed, strictly because he was black. (Keep in mind, this is the “Hollywood” account of events, but after conducting further research on the matter, this account is probably not very far off from what actually happened.)

Thurgood Marshall, of course, had to overcome much adversity during his life and career to become “the first black” everything that he became. But silencing an attorney in court is just next-level hoops to jump through, and he managed to do what needed to be done despite every disadvantage. This is what really holds your interest during the movie. Another aspect of this movie that makes it interesting is its similarity to Harper Lee’sTo Kill A Mockingbird, which is of course one of my very favorite court-based dramas. Marshall really is like the real-life Macomb, Alabama v. Tom Robinson. Set in Connecticut, a bit less dramatic perhaps, but definitely a very similar case, defendant, plaintiff, attorneys, judge, and social climate.

The story is well written as Marshall manages to get the point across of how focused and determined Thurgood Marshall was without making him seem anything other than human. The film takes you through Marshall’s sometimes rocky relationship with this Jewish lawyer who isn’t always on board with the program and definitely gets more trouble than he signed up for. There is a metamorphosis in this relationship where the two men gain true mutual respect for one another that is very well executed and satisfying to watch. I also appreciate that the story is of a lesser-known case, and not so “on-the-nose” as Brown v. the Board of Ed. (When reviewing Marshall’s bio, you won’t come across mention of the Spell case without digging deeper.) This leaves room for actors to not have to look like the characters  they are portraying (not that I have any idea what anyone involved with Brown looked like, with the exception of Thurgood, but there were Supreme Court Justices whose likeness would have to be considered as well).  I must say, although Chadwick Boseman looks absolutely nothing like Thurgood Marshall he really does an outstanding job of making you forget that fact and believe he is a young, brilliant, somewhat cocky, Thurgood Marshall. And further regarding Mr. Boseman, for someone who has already brilliantly played Jackie Robinson (42) and James Brown (Get on Up) (both of which I recommend you watch if you’ve not seen them. The man is talented), his biopic roles are diverse enough so that you don’t get tired of seeing him do them.

The acting is strong, but I do believe that Josh Gad was miscast as attorney Sam Friedman.  It’s difficult to put an actor who is known for comedic roles into a more serious film and make it work.  On the one hand, he lightened the movie up to a certain degree; on the other hand, it would have been interesting to see the movie get darker, be heavier and more serious – and what that movie would have looked like.  At times it almost felt like a bro movie which isn’t a bad thing, but it muddled the message somewhat.  (Similarly to Loving where Nick Kroll was cast as this civil rights attorney and I was just waiting for him to make me laugh (mentioned here in my review of Loving)). Sterling K. Brown plays Spell, and I just want to see SKB everywhere all day long, every day.  Sterling K. Brown can do whatever he wants in my book. I’ve never seen Kate Hudson do a better job that I can recall.

Marshall earned 8.0 out of 10 bloops.  It’s a great movie that shouldn’t be missed. I would absolutely take my children to see it, particularly those of us raising young boys into young men.  And it doesn’t matter what ethnicity those young men may be. Overcoming real life adversity is always a powerful lesson for youth to learn about, witness and discuss. There are a couple of bad words and some violence, so take care. It is rated PG-13 for a reason, after all. It is inspirational and educational. I learned a couple of things about Justice Marshall I didn’t know before and it made me want to research him further than I already have.  It is well written, well acted, entertaining and will hold your interest all the way through. It’s still playing in NYC theaters if you want to catch it before it leaves.  If that’s not possible, when it streams make sure to see it.

Thank you for reading. You can scroll down, enter your email address to subscribe to bloopbymimi, and never miss a review!

 Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

Welcome message

What I’m seeing next…

Unfortunately, what I’m seeing next hasn’t changed from last week.  Thanksgiving and all the fanfare that goes with it and a death in the family sidetracked me, once again.  Lots to catch up on and I will get there.  Please bear with me.  Along with these three:

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri;
Wonder; and
Roman J. Israel, Esq.

I will be seeing:

The Shape of Water; and
The Disaster Artist

Previous Reviews

The Man Who Invented Christmas
Victoria and Abdul
Thor: Ragnarok
Kingsman: The Golden Circle
Mother!
It
Good Time
Atomic Blonde
Dunkirk
Girls Trip
Spider-Man: Homecoming
The Big Sick
Baby Driver
All Eyez on Me 
It Comes at Night 
The Wedding Plan 
Wonder Woman
Everything, everything
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
Raw
Kong: Skull Island
Logan
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness 
Get Out
Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
I Am Not Your Negro
The Lobster