Alien: Covenant

Starring Michael Fassbender and Karen Waterston, Alien: Covenant is about a technologically advanced aircraft (with all the bells and whistles and appendages thereto) on a space mission to colonize a new planet. Something goes wrong, blah, blah, blah and so on and so forth; and there’s your movie.

Apologies. I’m a bit late with this review, but I’m still catching up on things here after being laid up for like six weeks.  Moving on…

Although sci-fi isn’t “my thing,” I have somehow managed to see all of the Alien films from way back in 1979 to the present. Don’t ask me how that happened.  It just did.  It certainly wasn’t purposeful.  I have actually enjoyed the franchise because sequels are not pumped out for profits and obvious cliff hangers are not left dangling all over the place.  A contained movie that can stand on its own (pretty much) is made each time.  Not here.  And I didn’t like that, along with a mess of other things I didn’t care for about this movie.

First let us discuss what I liked. The acting was pretty good.  Fassbender’s and Waterston’s performance, in particular, elevated this film and the supporting cast did a good job (an honorable mention goes to Danny McBride for his performance, mainly because his character was just so likeable). The action was well choreographed, the effects were strong and the set design and cinematography are top-notch.  The fact that this story plays like a sci-fi/horror flick at times is what I like most about it.

Now, on to what I didn’t care for; and I’m going to try to not be too brutal here because it isn’t a bad movie, it just isn’t a great one – regardless of how much love you may or may not have for the franchise, or whatever, love will not make this movie great. Aside from the fact that the Aliens have been cross-bred (which explains their new look and behavior), the rest of the elements in this film are nothing we haven’t seen before.

The plot of this movie is feeble. Now, the premise is supposed to include the fact that something goes wrong with the ship that makes these people wind up having to deal with these creatures, but absolutely nothing goes wrong!  A bit of interference occurs.  The crew hears a voice somewhere out in space, but nothing life threatening occurs.  What captain on a mission suddenly decides to change course because they heard a voice out in space?  Out.  In.  Space.  It’s not as if he heard a baby crying on his front doorstep.  We are in outer space!  It’s not like dropping by the house two doors down to check on the neighbors.  Outer space.  And doesn’t he have someone to answer to somewhere?  If I were a crew member, we would have had a real problem, is all I am saying, and this would have been a completely different movie.  Ridiculousness…  No Sir.  We are not stopping what we are doing to go investigate, Scooby Doo style, some voice that you think was transmitted from some planet we have no information about.  No we’re not.

I almost feel as though I’m talking about Passengers right now. Not that Alien: Covenant is as bad as all that, but similarly, the movie falls apart at the very point where it is meant to begin.  In other words, the premise is just kind of silly.  And as in Passengers, the writers here attempt to twist this poor decision the captain makes into some sort of “question of conscience,” which doesn’t fly because if the question becomes do we risk ourselves to save one unknown somebody or do we protect the thousands who are on board this ship against the unknown, there is no question.  Additionally, since there was zero consideration given for the safety or well being of those thousands of sleeping people on board at any time during the course of the movie – why were they even there?

The painful attempts at plot twist are so weak it’s almost sad. The way things play out is very boilerplate and predictable, from Fassbender’s fight with his “brother” (like, who didn’t see that coming?), to the ending.  And was I the only one who felt slightly uncomfortable during that flute scene?  What was that!?  Whatever it was, thankfully Fassbender played it well.

The “colonization of a new planet while people sleep in pods on a years-long journey” is kind of a stale premise.  Come on…And the painful set up for the sequel… I can’t.  I just didn’t appreciate seeing Alien reduced to looking like all the rest of the “crank ‘em out and stack money” franchises.  It hasn’t been that way up until this point, but it looks as though we have taken a turn here.  You can certainly feel the influence of the comic franchise machine in this writing.

Alien: Covenant earned 6 out of 10 bloops. It’s a good movie that could have been much better.  I would venture a guess the studio even knew this, as it was released in spring, and not as a “summer blockbuster.”  If you’re super invested in the franchise you will probably like it more than I did.  As for me, I wanted to like it.  I really, really did.  It is beautiful to look at and well acted, but this installment falls flat.

Welcome message

What I’m Watching This Week

Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

Mini Reviews…

Hey there! It’s been a while since I reviewed anything. I had a bit of surgery to recover from but I’m much better now.  While I was down I binge watched so much Netflix, Hulu and HBO GO, etc., I don’t even remember all the things I watched.  So here are some mini-reviews of what I’ve seen.  Still haven’t seen The Handmaid’s Tale, the seventh season of Archer, second season of Master of None, and Queen Sugar (I know I’m late.  Don’t judge me!), but they are soooo on my list. Thank you to everyone who kept checking to see if I had written anything and those who kept reading, referring and sharing what I’ve already written and kept my little blog alive.  Sincerely, thank you so much.

Ballers
HBO – starring the Rock
7.5 out of 10 bloops

I like this show. It is worth seeing, particularly if you’re a fan of the Rock.  It’s kind of like Entourage meets Arliss.  If you liked those shows, you’ll really like this one.

Dear White People
Netflix
8.5 out of 10 bloops

Surprisingly, much better than I expected it to be given that I disliked the movie very, very much. I felt like it was too similar to something Spike Lee had already made, and if I want to see a Spike Lee movie, I can watch a Spike Lee movie.  What really made me watch the Netflix series is that one of the episodes is directed by Barry Jenkins (Moonlight).  Would have been really nice if they could have gotten Spike Lee to direct one, but alas… The uniqueness of the format of the show is what makes it interesting.  It’s well acted, well cast, and confronts and discusses important issues surrounding racists and racism.  Another one of the programs the very people who need to be watching won’t.  You think it is going to be an exercise in bashing white people but it is really about engaging one another in a conversation, coming to some understanding about one another and working toward solutions.

13 Reasons Why
Netflix
8.5 out of 10 bloops

Another great show which puts suicide all up in your face, and covers all the things that can contribute to it, including but not limited to, low self esteem, negative self image, peer pressure, bullying, sexual assault, rape culture, depression, underage drinking, and just so much more.  If you have a tween or teenager who is willing to watch it with you, you really should.  You could literally talk about each episode for hours because there is so much going on in the story with these young people.  And no, it does not glorify suicide.  This is a mini-review, so I won’t get into all of that.  Watch it and form your own opinion.  The initial premise is a bit silly to me, but you have to go with it to get through the story.  A second season is coming.  I guess it will be interesting to see how that is executed.

Greenleaf
OWN
9.0 out of 10 bloops

All I can say is Oprah… Holy Crap Girl! You have done it!  Haven’t seen Queen Sugar yet, but this right here is fire!  If you like drama and excellent acting I can’t tell you enough how much I encourage you to watch Greenleaf.  It’s about a pastor of a megachurch and his dynasty.  Lynn Whitfield is outstanding as the first lady of the church and it’s like someone spilled all the church secrets.  Very well done, indeed.  It’s dramatic like Empire, but with class and Jesus.  And there’s a Winans in it and everything!  The music is an important part of the show.

This is Us
NBC/I think I watched on Hulu or Amazon. I really cannot remember.  Check both.  It’s worth it!
9.0 out of 10 bloops

This show features a multicultural, multifaceted family that contains a bunch of imperfect people trying to navigate how to love each other and stay together. You see, the family looks all perfect and kumbayaa on the outside, but if you look a little bit deeper you see all the many, many, flaws – just like real families.  And they’re beautiful.  And they love each other.  It is just a beautiful show.  If you have almost any type of family relationship troubles, you will see your loved ones in this show.  I was told it will make me cry every week, which is why I avoided it.  (I don’t know about anyone else but I don’t want to be crying over some t.v. show every week.  Life is hard enough as it is.)  It didn’t make me cry every week, but when it gets you, it gets you and it isn’t terrible.  Well-acted, well written, well-conceived, just superbly well done.

Other Reviews:

Everything, everything
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
The Belko Experiment
Beauty and the Beast
Raw

Kong: Skull Island
Logan
Bitter Harvest
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness
Get Out
Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
Florence Foster Jenkins
I Am Not Your Negro

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Everything, Everything

Starring Amandla Stenberg (as Maddy) and Nick Robinson (as Olly), Everything, Everything is based on a young adult novel by Nicola Yoon. Olly has just moved in next door and he and Maddy are teen love interests doing all they can to work around the fact that Maddy has a rare autoimmune disease which prohibits her from ever leaving her home. Maddie is allergic to so many things she has no idea of all the things she may be allergic to and her immune system does very little to protect her from bacteria, viruses and infection, so she has to live a shuttered life.  Along with this huge issue, Maddy’s understandably overprotective mom forbids the relationship and Olly’s dad is physically abusive toward his mom and has a problem holding down a job.

Let’s just dive in, shall we? Everything, Everything has several problems that overshadow whatever may be “good” about it.  The narrator (Maddy) explains most of Maddy’s medical history, some of Maddy’s family history, her feelings for the boy she cannot touch, her emotional state at any given moment, how much it stinks being isolated for all these years, etc.  This makes the movie dull at points because there are several scenes (some of them too lengthy) where you watch this pretty girl isolated in her room while listening to narration.  Stenberg does a great job at changing her facial expressions in sync with the narration, but it’s not enough.  Then there are the cute but silent scenes (because Maddy is inside the house and Olly is outside or across the way in his own bedroom) where the two teens are establishing their relationship.  So, there are bits of time where there is no dialogue between characters.

Some of the best scenes occur in Maddy’s imagination, where she is capable of being outside of her home, talking to a person face to face with no glass between them; and that would be fine, except that sadly even in her imagination she is sick and discussing dying. So, all of these elements – the narrated silent scenes, the silent scenes with the potential boyfriend, along with the flashbacks, the imaginary scenes and the real-time actual scenes Maddy has with her mother and her nurse, etc. – make the movie feel extremely choppy.  There are a lot of moving parts to this film and they do not work together effortlessly.

If you’re old enough to remember The Boy in the Plastic Bubble (1976), there’s really nothing new to see here as far as the story goes. I haven’t seen that movie in years, but still remember the way it made me feel.  Everything, Everything did not give me those feelings at all.  It isn’t a cheesy movie, which is a good thing; but neither did it make me sniffle or cry or smile widely – not even at the end.  The movie feels sterile, like Maddy’s room.  I mean, this girl is sick.  You believe she is going to die without seeing an ocean or kissing a boy or going to college.  As lovely as her home is, she can never leave.  The sadness is already there, but I just didn’t feel it strongly enough; and when more joyful moments occurred I didn’t feel those as strongly as I would have liked to either.  Perhaps I was having an off day; who’s to say?  I was invested in this story and its characters.  It just didn’t give me much back.

On a positive note, there are some interesting themes that run through the story which make the movie worth watching and the acting of the two young leads was very good.  Also, there are some surprises in this otherwise pretty predictable story.

Everything, Everything earned 6 out of 10 bloops. It’s not bad, but could have been better.  Tweens and teens and romantic saps (I’m not judging…  I’m just saying…) will most likely care for it much more than I did.   As for adults, if you don’t have a child or know a child who wants to see it I would advise you to wait for it to stream if you’re interested in the movie at all.

Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

It’s been a while…

Hey there! It’s been a while since I reviewed anything. I had a bit of surgery to recover from but I’m much better now.  While I was down I binge watched so much Netflix, Hulu and HBO GO, etc., I don’t even remember all the things I watched.  So here are some mini-reviews of what I’ve seen.  Still haven’t seen The Handmaid’s Tale, the seventh season of Archer, second season of Master of None, and Queen Sugar (I know I’m late.  Don’t judge me!), but they are soooo on my list. Thank you to everyone who kept checking to see if I had written anything and those who kept reading, referring and sharing what I’ve already written and kept my little blog alive.  Sincerely, thank you so much.

Ballers
HBO – starring the Rock
7.5 out of 10 bloops

I like this show. It is worth seeing, particularly if you’re a fan of the Rock.  It’s kind of like Entourage meets Arliss.  If you liked those shows, you’ll really like this one.

Dear White People
Netflix
8.5 out of 10 bloops

Surprisingly, much better than I expected it to be given that I disliked the movie very, very much. I felt like it was too similar to something Spike Lee had already made, and if I want to see a Spike Lee movie, I can watch a Spike Lee movie.  What really made me watch the Netflix series is that one of the episodes is directed by Barry Jenkins (Moonlight).  Would have been really nice if they could have gotten Spike Lee to direct one, but alas… The uniqueness of the format of the show is what makes it interesting.  It’s well acted, well cast, and confronts and discusses important issues surrounding racists and racism.  Another one of the programs the very people who need to be watching won’t.  You think it is going to be an exercise in bashing white people but it is really about engaging one another in a conversation, coming to some understanding about one another and working toward solutions.

13 Reasons Why
Netflix
8.5 out of 10 bloops

Another great show which puts suicide all up in your face, and covers all the things that can contribute to it, including but not limited to, low self esteem, negative self image, peer pressure, bullying, sexual assault, rape culture, depression, underage drinking, and just so much more.  If you have a tween or teenager who is willing to watch it with you, you really should.  You could literally talk about each episode for hours because there is so much going on in the story with these young people.  And no, it does not glorify suicide.  This is a mini-review, so I won’t get into all of that.  Watch it and form your own opinion.  The initial premise is a bit silly to me, but you have to go with it to get through the story.  A second season is coming.  I guess it will be interesting to see how that is executed.

Greenleaf
OWN
9.0 out of 10 bloops

All I can say is Oprah… Holy Crap Girl! You have done it!  Haven’t seen Queen Sugar yet, but this right here is fire!  If you like drama and excellent acting I can’t tell you enough how much I encourage you to watch Greenleaf.  It’s about a pastor of a megachurch and his dynasty.  Lynn Whitfield is outstanding as the first lady of the church and it’s like someone spilled all the church secrets.  Very well done, indeed.  It’s dramatic like Empire, but with class and Jesus.  And there’s a Winans in it and everything!  The music is an important part of the show.

This is Us
NBC/I think I watched on Hulu or Amazon. I really cannot remember.  Check both.  It’s worth it!
9.0 out of 10 bloops

This show features a multicultural, multifaceted family that contains a bunch of imperfect people trying to navigate how to love each other and stay together. You see, the family looks all perfect and kumbayaa on the outside, but if you look a little bit deeper you see all the many, many, flaws – just like real families.  And they’re beautiful.  And they love each other.  It is just a beautiful show.  If you have almost any type of family relationship troubles, you will see your loved ones in this show.  I was told it will make me cry every week, which is why I avoided it.  (I don’t know about anyone else but I don’t want to be crying over some t.v. show every week.  Life is hard enough as it is.)  It didn’t make me cry every week, but when it gets you, it gets you and it isn’t terrible.  Well-acted, well written, well-conceived, just superbly well done.

Welcome message

What I’m Watching This Week

  • Alien: Covenant – Hoping to get a preview pass for this one by tomorrow at least!!! Who couldn’t love an Alien movie?
  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul – After seeing the commercial for this I was interested.  A family road trip with no devices.  Sounds like hell.  Poor children.

Other Reviews:

Beauty and the Beast
Raw

Kong: Skull Island
Logan
Bitter Harvest
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness
Get Out
Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
Florence Foster Jenkins
I Am Not Your Negro

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

Starring Charlie Hunnam (Sons of Anarchy) and directed by Guy Ritchie, King Arthur: Legend of the Sword is, you know… an interpretation of the story of King Arthur; as in Knights of the Round Table, Merlin the Magician, etc., King Arthur.  It’s one of those stories that has been told many, many times and in many ways on film, including animation, satire, fantasy/action/adventure/drama.  And I totally had to go see it after I heard Sandy Kenyon’s review, which was just too sad to even be funny.

Where this film goes wrong lies with two crucial elements of this movie are just “off.”

#1 – Director. Not that I don’t care for Guy’s work.  He’s okay with me.  But here he imposes his sleek, modern style of film making into this late 5th-early 6th century tale and the result is at times it works well and is charming, and at other times it’s a painfully bad fit.  I use the word “imposes” because during the course of the entire movie things just feel very forced, when had his style been “infused” into the film it might have flowed more effortlessly.  For example, in one scene Charlie Hunnam walks across the set with all the swag of Jax Teller and it is as if Jax Teller were playing King Arthur!  No!  No!  No!  Nobody in 5th century England was likely walking with a bop in their step; I mean it’s possible, but not probable.  Little things like this made the movie laughable at times (and I’m not talking about the good kind of laughable, or the moments that were intended to be funny – and there were a few), and with just a bit more care and effort, we all could have had a better movie.

#2 – The screenplay. Guy helped co-write the screenplay, and the story felt as though it had more than a few hands on it – as if it had been a bit overwritten.  This story didn’t quite know if it wanted to be historical, mystical, beautiful, comical, dramatic, tragic, epic – it was just all over the place because it did not work as all of these things at once.  The balance in the story just wasn’t there.  The story itself is definitely stale, having been told many times over the years, but the attempt to “freshen” the material with Ritchie’s style was a mistake, unless he was going to modernize the setting or just make the characters straight-gangster and make an R-Rated version.  Now THAT would be a movie worth making and one I would be more likely to pay to see.  I must say that this is the most multicultural cast of characters I have ever seen in the telling of this particular story, and I appreciated that.  It is a beautiful thing to see people of color working on the big screen – BUT, it did absolutely nothing to modernized the story in any meaningful way (because the setting was still 5th century England), nor did it change the story in a way that made it more interesting or entertaining.  Someone else may feel differently about it.  Me personally, I don’t care if the entire cast is whatever nationality, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or whatever, as long as the movie is good.  And as far as the story itself, it may have worked on paper, and in theory I can even see where it might work, but the execution fails.

While watching Mr. Kenyon’s review he made mention of the terrible acting by David Beckham (I believe he mentions another critic claimed it is some of the worst acting he’d ever seen on film or something to that effect). But let me just say, Becks (see how I refer to David Beckham as though we’ve met…) only had two lines and they were two terribly written lines.  The worst part of this movie by far for me was listening to Astrid Bergès-Frisbey as The Mage.  I thought she was absolutely and tragically, terrible.  This character had no presence, no energy (as she tried to be “ethereal” and came off as horror movie creepy), no emotion (yes, I understand she is The Mage, but give us something) and her accent was super-annoying.  I mean, to point out one character with such a small role, just because it’s Becks and exclude this horrible, large (she is billed second on IMDB) role from criticism, is unfathomable to me.  Now I’m critiquing the critic!  I’m done with this movie!

What saves the movie from being a total wash out is the wardrobe (particularly the well tailored clothes on Hunnam), the cinematography/camera work, the choreography of the battle scenes, the effects, some of the acting, the jokes, and I gotta tell ya – looking at Charlie Hunnam for two hours will never a problem for me (unless something goes horribly, horribly wrong, heaven forbid, and God bless him).

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, despite that big budget and great industry expectations, earned 5.5 out of 10 bloops.  I can’t give it 6 bloops because I can’t say the movie is “not bad” because, believe me, neither is it good.  It’s not quite bad enough to walk out on which makes it so-so and worth it if you didn’t have to pay, but I kind of wished I had walked out when it was over.  Thank goodness I didn’t have to pay!  Bottom line – the movie isn’t worth the price of the ticket unless you really, really love a period piece, or Charlie Hunnam or Guy Ritchie.  It could have, of course, been much better for $175 million dollars…but alas… Rent it when it comes out on demand perhaps, if you care to.

Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

It’s been a while…

Hey there! It’s been a while since I reviewed anything. I had a small bit of surgery to recover from but I’m much better now.  While I was down I binge watched so much Netflix, Hulu and HBO GO, etc., I don’t even remember all the things I watched.  So here are some mini-reviews of what I’ve seen.  Still haven’t seen The Handmaid’s Tale, the seventh season of Archer, second season of Master of None, and Queen Sugar (I know I’m late.  Don’t judge me!), but they are soooo on my list. Thank you to everyone who kept checking to see if I had written anything and those who kept reading, referring and sharing what I’ve already written and kept my little blog alive.  Sincerely, thank you so much.

Ballers
HBO – starring the Rock
7.5 out of 10 bloops

I like this show. It is worth seeing, particularly if you’re a fan of the Rock.  It’s kind of like Entourage meets Arliss.  If you liked those shows, you’ll really like this one.

Dear White People
Netflix
8.5 out of 10 bloops

Surprisingly, much better than I expected it to be given that I disliked the movie very, very much. I felt like it was too similar to something Spike Lee had already made, and if I want to see a Spike Lee movie, I can watch a Spike Lee movie.  What really made me watch the Netflix series is that one of the episodes is directed by Barry Jenkins (Moonlight).  Would have been really nice if they could have gotten Spike Lee to direct one, but alas… The uniqueness of the format of the show is what makes it interesting.  It’s well acted, well cast, and confronts and discusses important issues surrounding racists and racism.  Another one of the programs the very people who need to be watching won’t.  You think it is going to be an exercise in bashing white people but it is really about engaging one another in a conversation, coming to some understanding about one another and working toward solutions.

13 Reasons Why
Netflix
8.5 out of 10 bloops

Another great show which puts suicide all up in your face, and covers all the things that can contribute to it, including but not limited to, low self esteem, negative self image, peer pressure, bullying, sexual assault, rape culture, depression, underage drinking, and just so much more.  If you have a tween or teenager who is willing to watch it with you, you really should.  You could literally talk about each episode for hours because there is so much going on in the story with these young people.  And no, it does not glorify suicide.  This is a mini-review, so I won’t get into all of that.  Watch it and form your own opinion.  The initial premise is a bit silly to me, but you have to go with it to get through the story.  A second season is coming.  I guess it will be interesting to see how that is executed.

Greenleaf
OWN
9.0 out of 10 bloops

All I can say is Oprah… Holy Crap Girl! You have done it!  Haven’t seen Queen Sugar yet, but this right here is fire!  If you like drama and excellent acting I can’t tell you enough how much I encourage you to watch Greenleaf.  It’s about a pastor of a megachurch and his dynasty.  Lynn Whitfield is outstanding as the first lady of the church and it’s like someone spilled all the church secrets.  Very well done, indeed.  It’s dramatic like Empire, but with class and Jesus.  And there’s a Winans in it and everything!  The music is an important part of the show.

This is Us
NBC/I think I watched on Hulu or Amazon. I really cannot remember.  Check both.  It’s worth it!
9.0 out of 10 bloops

This show features a multicultural, multifaceted family that contains a bunch of imperfect people trying to navigate how to love each other and stay together. You see, the family looks all perfect and kumbayaa on the outside, but if you look a little bit deeper you see all the many, many, flaws – just like real families.  And they’re beautiful.  And they love each other.  It is just a beautiful show.  If you have almost any type of family relationship troubles, you will see your loved ones in this show.  I was told it will make me cry every week, which is why I avoided it.  (I don’t know about anyone else but I don’t want to be crying over some t.v. show every week.  Life is hard enough as it is.)  It didn’t make me cry every week, but when it gets you, it gets you and it isn’t terrible.  Well-acted, well written, well-conceived, just superbly well done.

Welcome message

What I’m Watching This Week

  • Alien: Covenant – hoping to get a preview pass for this one by tomorrow at least!!! Who couldn’t love an Alien movie?
  • Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul – After seeing the commercial for this I was interested.  A family road trip with no devices.  Sounds like hell.  Poor children.
  • Everything, everything – for something sad and sappy and beautiful.

Recent Reviews:

Beauty and the Beast
Raw

Kong: Skull Island
Logan
Bitter Harvest
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness
Get Out

Oscar reviews:

Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
Florence Foster Jenkins
I Am Not Your Negro