Sleepless (R)

A remake of the 2011 French film Nuit blanche (Sleepless Night), Sleepless, starring Jaimie Foxx, Scoot McNairy, Dermot Mulrony and Michelle Monaghan centers on the one-night adventure of one dirty cop whose son is kidnapped after he and his partner mistakenly rob the wrong Las Vegas drug dealer of his dope.  This cop has to return those drugs in order to get his son back alive.

This film has a very 90’s film feel to it. It will remind you of Die Hard, Rush Hour, Bad Boys, etc., but it’s not as good as those films. It does feature a couple of twists, but the problem is that the movie is too contrived and predictable in all the wrong ways to get any real impact out of those twists.   It is a fun movie, at times, and features some well-choreographed fight scenes and shootouts, if you like that sort of thing as much as I do.  It is entertaining to some extent, but also gets too unrealistic and cliché at times.  It is one hour and thirty five minutes that moves along at a decent pace – so it wasn’t too long and it did not “drag” or have a lot of fluff or fussiness to it.  It contains a proper amount of violence and action, but somehow, it just failed to hit the action movie “spot” for me.  Perhaps it’s just that there’s nothing new here.  We’ve seen it all before and there was nothing unique or elevated about the execution.

Nuit blanche earned a metascore of 75 while Sleepless earned 33. This means the original got more generally favorable reviews and the remake got more generally unfavorable reviews.  If the budget was tripled and the remake is just “so-so,” I really cannot explain what happened here.  Now I want to see the original movie (reportedly made for between $4 and $10 million) and compare it to this $30 million remake.  I know a bigger budget doesn’t guarantee a better movie, but with both movies being about the same length I wonder what elements are different between the two that cause such a disparity in ratings.  The production was fine.  The cinematography was okay, the fight scenes were great, the setting is one of my favorite places – Vegas, the acting was fine (for the most part), the writing was okay.  There are plenty of interesting characters featured. It had an element of suspense that kept me engaged. There was a sense of fun to it all at times.  There was just nothing exceptional about it.  It does not “wow” you, or at least, it did not “wow” me.

Sleepless earned 6.5 out of 10 bloops. It’s not a bad movie, but it could have been better.  It’s almost a good movie – admittedly, so very close to being good that it’s hard to judge; you may certainly like it more than I did.  But you can definitely catch it streaming (which should be soon if the sales from the original are any indication.  It earned $2,160 on its one and only weekend that it played in the U.S.)  Sleepless is better than it looks, but not as good as it could be or should be.

Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

Upcoming This Week:

  • A Dog’s Purpose, starring Dennis Quaid
  • Gold, starring Matthew McConaughey

Note: When I find Nuit blanche I’ll let you know what I think of it here in the notes, unless the movie is so much better than Sleepless it merits its own review.

Note: I’ve seen and reviewed all the movies nominated for the main awards, so I’m just waiting for the Oscars now. The only other movies that I want to see are 4 of the 5 Best Foreign Language Film contenders (I’ve seen/reviewed and A Man Called Ove, and loved it so much I am now actually reading the book!).  And I want to see a couple of the Animated movies (Moana and Kubo and the Two Strings, specifically). If any of these are worth reviewing I’ll be sure to let you know.  As always, thank you for reading!

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Split (R)

Produced (along with 6 others), directed and written by M. Night Shyamalan, Split is a tale of three girls who are kidnapped by a man diagnosed with 23 distinct personalities.  The girls need to escape before the impending emergence of a frightening, new 24th personality.

I must say, there is a certain maturity to this movie. The psychology behind the story is interesting, seems to be well researched, and is very well utilized here.  Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) f/k/a Split Personality Disorder combined with horror is nothing new (Jekyll & Hyde, Psycho, Dressed to Kill, Primal Fear), but here Shyamalan multiplies it (not two or three personalities, but 23), fuses the psychology with a horrific situation and adds a few thrills.

A character with 23 personalities gives James McAvoy (who displays 8 of them) a great opportunity to really show how adept he is at his craft. He does an outstanding job going in and out, weaving together a seamless performance among these multiple personalities who each serve as their own character because they are so diverse.  Whatever may be deficient about this film, it is not him.  His performance alone makes this movie worth seeing.  Anya Taylor-Joy, (as Casey) again plays a socially disconnected character as she did in Morgan, and she does this well.  Casey’s backstory is as interesting as the psychological thriller portion of the movie.  It’s always a pleasure seeing Betty Buckley working.  She did a great job.

Now let’s talk about what’s not to like, and there was quite a bit, I must say. Most of the problems involved the writing.  Some portions of the story were quite predictable.  One of the hostages was an airhead who got my nerves.  Characters’ actions defied common sense at times – typical “horror” genre stuff.  The movie pulls you in from the beginning but doesn’t hold you because at times the characters did the most frustrating things that had me throwing up my hands, talking to myself (there was a lot of that going on in the theater), holding my head in my hands, shaking my head, laughing at how stupid this scene or that scene was… etc.  The script could have used more editing and the length of this movie should most certainly have been shortened by a good 15 minutes.  There were times I wondered if I would get through it, if I should walk out.  You know me… shifting in my seat and checking the time are a bad sign, and there was plenty of that going on.  But then I’d get back into it for a few minutes, and be back to groaning shortly thereafter.  It’s an interesting but very frustrating movie.  Getting to know the multiple identities was actually fun, which is not necessarily a good thing for a movie billed as a horror/thriller.  The movie is more tense than scary.

Split earned 7 out of 10 bloops. Although it should have been 6 out of 10 because it could have been much better, McAvoy’s performance is really strong and worth seeing.  This one is tricky because I really can’t recommend anyone run to the theater and pay to see this movie, but I would certainly advise you to catch it streaming.

Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

Up Next!  Sleepless, the action thriller starring Dermot Mulrony and Jamie Foxx.  Thank you so much for reading!

My Welcome Message

The Founder (PG-13)

The Founder, starring Michael Keaton, tells the story of how McDonald’s fast food restaurant “founder” Ray Kroc singlehandedly not only stole the entire concept of the McDonald’s brothers’ restaurant; but how he put the business on the map and eventually (quite purposefully, with zeal and glee), put the original founding brothers out of business for good.

This story is just about as American as it gets. A struggling salesman comes across an idea that he can envision becoming a huge opportunity for wealth.  With cold-blooded ambition and persistence he succeeds.  Robert D. Siegel did a great job writing this story, keeping the movie focused and the story moving forward. You simultaneously admire Kroc for his ambition and despise him for the ruthlessness with which he carries it out.  You pull for the little guy, the McDonald brothers, even though you know they’re doomed.  This movie is really quite well done.  John Lee Hanckock does a fine job directing as Ray travels across the country and back in pursuit of this far-fetched dream that comes together with quite a few bumps along the way.  He tackles one obstacle, then the next, then the next, until he is sitting on top of the world, or so it seems.  You’re cheering for him to succeed until… well, you’ll see.

The cinematography was lovely. The set design, props, makeup, hair and clothing were all well done and true to the 1950’s.  You may feel nostalgic for an era long gone when you see what now seems like ancient tools people used to get around and to communicate.  I mean, just imagine travelling cross-country by car without a cell phone!  How did people survive!?

If you are a fan of Shark Tank you will love this movie. The entire evolution of this small business into an international giant is pretty inspirational.  Although it didn’t turn out quite as the McDonald brothers planned, the movie has many lessons embedded pertaining to business and life and the nature of people vs. big business.  It is a step-by-step tutorial of what not to do if you want to remain in control of your business and how sometimes it is best to be satisfied with keeping the scale of business small; a true cautionary tale if ever there were one.  But in Kroc’s case, this movie plays out like McDonald’s and the fortune that came with it was his destiny – or he made it his destiny, at any rate.

Michael Keaton is becoming “That Dude.” He is consistently delivering, knows his strengths and weaknesses, picks interesting roles in interesting projects, and naturally, is becoming more effortless with his acting.  Mr. Mom, Beetlejuice, up to and including Birdman – I cannot think of one thing he’s done that I can say I didn’t enjoy; or at the very least, where I didn’t enjoy his performance.  And yes.  I will admit it.  I even enjoyed his Batman.  Don’t judge me…

That being said, Keaton pulls it out again as Ray Kroc; a shrewd businessman who is hell bent on success by any means once he gets his first taste of it. And the way Keaton portrays the evolution of this man from door to door salesman to corporate titan is commendable.  You love him and you hate him, and Keaton makes you believe it all.  Nick Offerman and John Carroll Lynch are perfectly cast and do an outstanding job as the McDonald brothers.

The Founder earned 8.5 out of 10 bloops. It’s a great movie that shouldn’t be missed.  I learned some things I had no idea about from the story.  I was never bored; I didn’t check my watch or look at my phone one time.  There were a couple of laughs and some painful, head-shaking moments.  If there was a cuss word in it I don’t recall what it was, although I’m sure there was probably one or two.  Still, it is mostly-family friendly with a PG-13 rating.  The acting was solid as was everything put forth by the entire team.

Thank you for reading. You can scroll down, enter your email address, and never miss a review!

 Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

Welcome message

Other Reviews

Good Time
Atomic Blonde
Dunkirk
Girls Trip
Spider-Man: Homecoming
The Big Sick
Baby Driver
All Eyez on Me 
It Comes at Night 
The Wedding Plan 
Wonder Woman
Everything, everything
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
Raw

Kong: Skull Island
Logan
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness 
Get Out

Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
Florence Foster Jenkins
I Am Not Your Negro

20th Century Women (R)

Starring Annette Benning and Lucas Jade Zumann, 20th Century Women is a story about so many things I don’t even know where to begin.

Yes I do. Let’s begin with the fact that I had to work very hard not to walk out on this movie after 15 minutes. I thought I should get a refund while I could, but I stuck with it because I heard positive things about the movie and Benning’s performance.  I thought the movie could turn around and be one of the most amazing things I’ve ever missed.  I was hopeful.  At the 30 minute mark my hopes were dashed and I found myself regretting my initial instinct to leave after 15 minutes.  (The general rule is that you can only get a refund if you speak up in the first 20 minutes.) This left me with another hour and a half of movie to sit through, and man-oh-man, most of it was excruciating.  I don’t remember the last time I was so happy that a movie ended.  I very nearly applauded.

Annette Benning plays Dorothea, a divorced mother with a teenaged son named Jamie. Dorothea owns/runs a boarding house in California in the late 1970s. There is an attempt to portray these boarders as eccentric souls that fails to convince because they are overwritten and try much too hard.

Anyway, the story is about Dorothea’s independence, Jamie discovering his autonomy while coming of age, the eccentric boarders and all their various problems and pursuits, Jaime’s relationship with his best friend, cancer and the dangers of smoking, the boarders’ influence on the kid, the boarders’ influence on the mother, the end of the sexual revolution, the political transition from the 70’s into the 80’s, feminism, ageism, a time before there was a computer in every home, a parent learning she cannot be everything to her son and her learning to “let him go,” this mother watching her son rebel against her at every turn while he readily embraces the advice and influence of others around him, and some sort of theme regarding the more things change the more they stay the same that I just don’t care enough about to even try to explain.

Written and directed by Mike Mills, 20th Century Women is an unfocused, convoluted, and jumbled.  A poorly written script that is so frenetic, I cannot say whether it was poorly director or not. It is impossible to execute properly because there is simply too much and nothing to work with here.

I’ve already explained the “frenetic” part of the story; now on to the problem with the specificity of it all. I related to not one of these characters.  Their experience was very California-centric (where Mills hails from, naturally) in many ways.  For example, (I would type “spoiler alert,” but trust me when I tell you, it doesn’t even matter) when the kid runs away, he and his best friend take a car and ride up or down the coast to San Juan Obispo and rent a hotel room…  I’m from New York, born and raised.  My frame of reference for the term “running away” does not include teens in cars and seaside hotels.  If I took anyone’s car my dad would have killed me.  I had no credit card nor enough cash to rent a room at a hotel as a teen.  There was no seaside to escape to unless I ran away to Orchard Beach.  See where I’m going here?…  I couldn’t relate to the story from the point of view of the mother, the teenager or any of the other characters.  Sure, there was a lot of dialogue, and some of it provided a chuckle or two, but a lot of it was just nonsense, and the story, quite frankly, stunk.  I hate to put it like that.  I really do.  But sometimes it is what it is.  And if mention was made that Dorothea was born during the Depression one more time…  So!  What!  We get it.  There is a generation gap between a mother and her child, like there is between every parent and child.

You might be able to relate to these characters if 1) you are from California; 2) you have been a teenager or middle aged person in 1979; 3) you lived in a boarding house growing up; 4) you are a child of divorce or a divorced mom; 5) you have had a permissive mother or been the child of one; and/or 6) were born during the Depression. There are more specific elements as far as “relatability” of these characters goes, but you get my point.  Absolutely none of this applies to me.  And it isn’t that a movie must be about someone who looks, talks, acts like me and has had the same experiences as I have in order for me to enjoy it, but for this particular movie the lack of relatedness was a large part of what kept me from investing in the characters and enjoying them; along with the poorly written, unfocused story, of course.  I’m not certain whether this is some sort of autobiographical piece Mills has written, but it fails to earn the “slice of life” label because it occurs in too specific a set of circumstances, time, place, people – for it to be widely related to by different people from different walks of life, living or who grew up under dissimilar circumstances, in my opinion.

It’s a shame that Benning’s acting chops are squandered here. She did the best job she could with what she had.  I am personally unimpressed that she went make-up free, exposing every facial line and wrinkle.  She could have been fully beat by a glam squad and it would not have affected this movie one way or another.  It just didn’t matter.

20th Century Women earned 3.5 out of 10 bloops. I would not recommend it, as it isn’t even a “good” movie to watch if you don’t have to pay for it, in my opinion.  If there is nothing else on one lazy Saturday and it is shown anywhere, I would recommend you take a nap instead.  It’s about a woman with a child who is growing up like normal children do.  Nothing tragic, nothing cathartic, nothing exciting.  Nothing to see here.

Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

Up Next!  Martin Scorsese’s Silence was supposed to be next, but here’s “what had happened”:  Oscar nominations are announced tomorrow, so I’m not going to sit for 2 hours and 40 minutes for a movie I otherwise would have nearly no interest in; especially after sitting through 20th Century Women.  No thank you.  I’m quite displeased that my first movie of 2017 was such a dud after finishing 2016 so strong.  Anyhow, up next will be The Founder starring Michael Keaton as Ray Kroc, the founder of McDonald’s, M. Night Shyamalan’s thriller Split and Sleepless, the action thriller starring Dermot Mulrony and Jamie Foxx later this week.  Thank you so much for reading!

My Welcome Message

Passengers (PG-13)

I saw Passengers last week and started to write about it but found myself confused about what I saw, and I had to sort it all out.  It isn’t that Passengers is such a terrible movie.  It is, however, a poorly conceptualized one, as the heart of the plot is so ridiculous it ruins everything; which kind of does make it terrible, actually.  There will be some “spoilers” here, because I advise no one pay to see it and I cannot explain the issues I have with the movie without revealing some things about the plot.

Starring Jennifer Lawrence (playing Aurora Lane: yes; as in Princess Aurora from Sleeping Beauty) and Chris Pratt (playing Jim Preston), Passengers is a mixture of Sleeping Beauty, Titanic and attempts to emulate Adam and Eve in some ridiculous way – on a spacecraft.  Erdman Penner, author of Sleeping Beauty, is even mentioned in the writing credits.

Here’s what happens:

5,259 cryogenically sustained passengers (5,000) and crew members (259) are en route to colonize a new planet on a state of the art spacecraft.  The vessel in which they travel is said to be fool-proof (like the “unsinkable” Titanic), engineered to withstand any and all space events that may occur on this 120 year journey (Sleeping Beauty), without incident.  The passengers’ pods are set to wake them up from their cryogenic slumber 4 months before the ship lands.  Well, a “space event” occurs that causes Jim’s pod to malfunction and he wakes up 90 years too early.  He has no way to go back into the cryogenic state.  He spends a year alone (or rather alone and sometimes hanging out with a rather pleasant android bartender (played by Michael Sheen as one of the bright spots of the movie)), trying to access prohibited areas of the ship in an effort to fix his busted cryogenic pod.  One day he comes across the pod containing Aurora.  He becomes like some super creepy stalker, brushes up on her profile, falls in love with her and decides he is going to tamper with her pod and wake her up so he won’t be alone.  Aurora is on the way to the colony for the greatest journalism opportunity of her life and he wakes her up.  Why? Because why should he be the only left to suffer alone on this ship where he will surely die?  Why not pick some random soul and wake them up to keep from dying alone?  From there, the movie basically falls apart at the very point where it was meant to begin.  A love affair ensues, until Aurora finds out from the android bartender that Jim purposefully “woke her up,” and they break up.  THEN, the ship that is never supposed to malfunction malfunctions and is in need of repair, so Jim and Aurora set about dramatically saving the ship, themselves and the passengers.  They get back together and they live happily ever after.  That is, until they die. Blah, blah, blah.  The End.

To top it all off, somewhere in between the break up and the attempt to rescue all these passengers on this spacecraft, Lawrence Fishburn shows up for about 10 or 12 minutes or so, as a captain or a doctor or something or other (because at this point who the hell cares anymore, really?), just for the purpose of providing Jim and Aurora with what they need to save the ship.

This movie had far too many directions, elements, moving parts, messages, and sub-stories.  Since everything but the kitchen sink seemed to be thrown in here, I couldn’t help but think as I was watching Jim and Aurora break up, he should have gone all Jack Torrence from The Shining on her.  He should have started frothing at the mouth, telling her he is never going to let her go and chased her around the ship like a crazy man, and it could have turned into a very unexpected horror movie in space!  That would have been profoundly better than what happened in the last act of this movie.  If that would have happened, it would have been awesome!  It would have been epic!  It would have made this movie make some sort of sense at least!  But of course, none of that happened.

I don’t know these six guys who wrote this story, but someone should have told them that a love story where a man wakes a stranger up so she can die with him on a deserted spacecraft is not cool or romantic, and it shouldn’t be billed as a love story.  The gesture in itself is the opposite of cool, romance and love.  It’s like telling your daughter that if a boy pulls your hair it means he likes you.  No.  It doesn’t.  It means he is an un-socialized ass who needs to be corrected.

Lawrence does some of the worst and best acting I’ve ever seen from her right here.  She and Pratt looked like they had a good time making this movie, at least.  One scene had me laughing out loud, but apparently my laugh was inappropriate as no one else found the scene funny.  Have you ever laughed out loud at a movie alone?  It just caused me to laugh even harder.  I’m silly that way.  Anyway, it was Lawrence’s most dramatic scene of the movie, and by the time it came up I realized this story just wasn’t going to work for me and it struck me as pure comedy.

There was another huge flaw with the entire premise of the movie (along with many medium and small flaws that would keep us here for a while), but I feel as though I’ve made my case. There is no need to be abusive about it.

On a positive note, the set design and effects were absolutely amazing.  Aurora’s wardrobe was mostly ethereal and lovely.  The make-up and hair were on point.  The director did what he could with what he had to work with, I suppose.  And all that talent was wasted because of one tragically flawed plot point in this script.  And it always comes back around to the fact that Jim took away Aurora’s choice and made a life altering decision, that he knew was immoral.

As a woman, it felt like watching someone marry their abuser.  It just doesn’t seem right.  A feeling that he did the right thing cannot be established.  Just because she finally forgave him doesn’t mean I had to.  And I didn’t.  And I don’t.  This does not amount to a fairy tale because rather than “saving” her, he doomed her – so, for me, it will never work.  It doesn’t even work as an “anti-fairytale,” like Me Before You, because no matter what else happens, Aurora will always know Jim as the selfish s.o.b. who woke her up, made her miss the career opportunity of a lifetime, decided what the remainder of her life would be like and where it would end.  Maybe I’m just too much of a Scorpio to get over all that and I will own that.

Passengers earned 4.5 out of 10 bloops.  Some may think it is worth seeing if you have to pay, some may think it isn’t worth seeing at all and some may think it is great.  And there goes yet another part of the problem with Passengers; it forces you to have a subjective instead of an objective experience and that is not usually the stuff great films are made of.  I think it contains elements that make it worth a watch if you don’t have to pay, but then, thinking about it further, I wouldn’t even advise anyone to waste two hours of their life watching it for free. Just one woman’s opinion.  If you chose to venture forth, good luck to you!

Thank you for reading. You can scroll down to the bottom of this page, enter your email address, follow me and never miss a review!

Bloops:

1   =   worst ever, avoid at all cost
2   =   very bad, forget about it!
3   =   poor movie, not recommended
4   =   not good, even for free – NO!
5   =   so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6   =   not bad, could have been better
7   =   good movie, worth seeing
8   =   great movie, don’t miss it!
9   =   excellent movie, a must see!
10 =   a masterpiece, go see it now!

Up Next! 20th Century Women and Silence are coming up before the week is out and I still do not know in which order.  Thank you for continuing to read!

My Welcome Message

Other Reviews

Atomic Blonde
Dunkirk
Girls Trip
Spider-Man: Homecoming
The Big Sick
Baby Driver
All Eyez on Me 
It Comes at Night 
The Wedding Plan 
Wonder Woman
Everything, everything
King Arthur: Legend of the Sword
Raw

Kong: Skull Island
Logan
The Girl with All the Gifts
A Cure for Wellness 
Get Out

Hidden Figures
Fences
Moonlight
Hell or High Water
Loving
La La Land
Lion
Manchester by the Sea
Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Captain Fantastic
Elle
Jackie
Florence Foster Jenkins
I Am Not Your Negro

 

The Autopsy of Jane Doe (R)

Starring Brian Cox, Emile Hirsch and Olwen Catherine Kelly, The Autopsy of Jane Doe is  about a coroner and his apprentice son who live in a small town where there has been a family massacre.  The body of a “Jane Doe” (played by Kelly) is recovered from that massacre and dropped off at the morgue to figure out a cause of death.  When the body arrives strange things begin to happen inside the morgue and one horrifying night ensues.

Of course, The Autopsy of Jane Doe is gross because an autopsy is being performed on this corpse. If you cannot stand the sight of blood, or corpses, or incisions and the like, don’t do it to yourself.  You will be sorry.  Along with being what some may consider gross at times, the movie is also frightening because of the things that are happening in the morgue and the cold, sterile setting in which the action takes place.  This is a well-conceived, well executed, scary horror movie.  There is suspense right from the beginning that pulls you into the story and holds you there until the very end.  You get invested in the characters.  Most importantly, and surprisingly, you become invested in this corpse and you want to figure out what is going on.

The Autopsy of Jane Doe is thoughtfully written and the concept of the story is nothing short of riveting. The technique used to piece together these clues one gross piece at a time is brilliant.  Watching the story behind this Jane Doe unfold keeps you guessing about what the corpse will tell the coroners next.  I was so caught up in the autopsy that it took a while before snapped out of it and was like, “Okay, so what does this all mean and who is this girl?!”

Bryan Cox does some solid acting, particularly for a horror film. Things happen that have no logical explanation and you see him trying to wrap his head around the fact that these supernatural events are actually occurring.  As a man of science, the truth takes him a while to digest.  Certain occurrences are brushed off with pat explanations or left unquestioned because it conflicts with his beliefs, until he and his son can no longer brush them off.  Emile Hirsch does a really good job as well.

The effects and make-up in this movie are awesome! If you could imagine what an actual autopsy might be like or have seen parts of them reenacted you already have a general idea of what a real life autopsy might be like.  This autopsy is about as dead-on as it gets because you get to see so much of it and it is done so slowly and deliberately.

I cannot tell you the things I did not like about this movie without offering up spoilers, which I will not do here because the less you know about this movie, the better the movie works. Just know the movie is not quite a masterpiece in my opinion, but it’s close and I would recommend you see it for yourself.

The Autopsy of Jane Doe earned 9 out of 10 bloops. I think it is an excellent movie, worth seeing if horror is a genre you enjoy.  If I watch it again it might earn a 10, but I don’t believe I will be doing that any time soon.  Even if you don’t watch a lot of horror because many of them are so poorly executed, this one is worth a watch.  It definitely gets a bump up from the 7.5 I was going to give it initially to a 9 for the strong acting from Bryan Cox, the creativity in the story’s concept, the writing, the effects, and last but not least, the make-up.  If you’re a fraidy-cat like me, you won’t want to watch it alone before bed.  I am not ashamed to admit that I started it before bed, thought better of that decision, stopped it at about 2 minutes in and woke up to finish it in the morning.  Don’t judge me.  I watched it on Amazon Prime but it is playing at the IFC Center in New York at 9:50 p.m. at least through Thursday if you want that extra creepy “sitting with strangers in the dark while mindlessly munching on hot buttered popcorn” experience.  Happy New Year and Enjoy!

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Note:  I still haven’t found a character I like to represent a “bloop,” but here is a breakdown of how they work.

Bloops:

1 – worst ever, avoid at all cost
2 – very bad, forget about it!
3 – poor movie, not recommended
4 – not good, even for free – NO!
5 – so-so, worth it if you don’t have to pay
6 – not bad, could have been better
7 – good movie, worth seeing
8 – great movie, don’t miss it!
9 – excellent movie, a must see!
10 – a masterpiece, go see it now!

Note:  I know I said I would review Passengers last week, and I could tell you life happens and things got in the way, because they did.  But in all honesty, I couldn’t make myself care enough about that movie to write one word on it.  I have started writing it up and will publish my review this week.  Just so you know, do not go to see it.  Wait until you can see it for free.

Up Next: 20th Century Women and Silence. Don’t know in which order yet.  Thank you for continuing to read!

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